What is the difference between an Editor, a Proofreader and Copy Editor?

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Many people use the words editor, copy editor and proofreader interchangeably, but these roles are incredibly different.  Here is an overview of the difference between an

When hiring a professional editor, copy editor or proofreader, it is important you are clear about what kind of editor you are looking for.  Here is an overview of the difference between an editor, a copy editor and a proofreader, as well as where you should be spending your money.

An Editor

An editor’s role may be defined in many ways.

A editor is the person who is in charge of the final content of a newspaper, magazine, or multi-author book.  This editor will determine the scope and tone of the final piece and perform curatorial tasks in terms of positioning articles, determining the final layout and content before the collection, magazine or newspaper goes to print.

A fiction editor is the person who works closely with the writer to edit, structure, redefine, finish and bring a work of fiction into it’s best possible form.  An editor is responsible for helping the writer inprove the overall quality of the text.  This might include doing structural edits, line edits, copy edits and proofreading.

Structural editing is the act of looking at the flow, structure, story and progression of a piece of writing to ensure it is as clear and coherent as possible.  Structural edits also look at the overall tone and style of the writing to make sure it fits together cohesively.

As editors are required to have input on the content and style of the text, they are often hired because of their own individual style or specialization in a particular subject area.

An editor has the most intimate relationship with the writer, therefore it is important that both the writer and editor work well together, respect each others professional opinions and have the same expectations about the text they are working on.

Editor – $$$ Having a good editor that you work will with is priceless.  The writer / editor relationship can last a lifetime if you treat each other well and give each other the respect you deserve.  Most of the time this ‘respect’ will come in money form.

A Copy Editor

Copy Editing is a verb.  Copyediting is the actual work that an editor does to improve the style, formatting, presentation, readability and accuracy of a text.  Copy editing is different from general editing in that copy editing may not involve changing the content of the text being edited.

A copy editor will be able to pick up inconsistencies in grammar and different styles of writing.  Some measures of consistency include making sure names, locations and dates are always treated the same way.

A good copy editor will also have knowledge in different styles of writing, such as the difference between marketing text, professional manuals, medical writing, and fiction and creative writing.

An editor and a copy editor will likely perform both roles during their career.

Copyeditor – $$ – A copy editor is a skilled profession, and a good copy editor will come with a lot of experience, knowledge, and style advice that will lift your writing.

A Proof Reader

A proofreader probably has the most detailed and precise job of all the editors.  A proofreader will be one of the last people to read through a text before publication. is the reading of a galley

It is the proofreader’s job to detect and correct production error, tiny mistakes, typos and errors in grammar before the final print.

Proofreader – $ While a wonderful proofreader will cost you a lot of money, here is probably where you can afford to spend a little less, as the relationship between a writer and proofreader does not need to be a personal one.  What you are really looking for a person with a keen grasp of language and an eye for detail.

 

What has been your experience with editors, proofreaders and copy editors?  Share below.

What is Holding You Back?

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“Don’t be afraid of your fears. They’re not there to scare you. They’re there to let you know that something is worth it.”  ― C. JoyBell C.

A Fear of Success.

Have you ever heard of this?  Apparently I have it.  I was sitting around last night doing a funny test online, when I suddenly found out that I have a fear of Success.  The following is my result.

Your Result:

Fear of Success

You’re fairly confident in your abilities, but you balk at the pressure of maintaining success once you have it. You know that your achievements will breed higher expectations, and you worry that you won’t be able to meet them. You may even be experiencing what psychologists call impostor syndrome, the fear that those around you will discover you’re not really as talented or competent as they think. People who fear success often credit their achievements to circumstances rather than to their talent and other assets. The key for these people is to accept responsibility for their accomplishments.

 It turns out a fear of success is more complicated and difficult to cure than a fear of failure.

Being a failure is easy.  When you fail, everyone is nice to you, even if they think you’re stupid.  Failing is comfortable.  Your life will not change in any way if you try something new and fail.  When you fail, everything will stays the same.  Everyone rallies around the person who can’t get his or her shit together.  When you are successful, people watch you, wait for you to trip up, scrutinize your spelling and no one will worry about you.  Successful people essentially get left out of the community circle.  Successful people are the ones who are called upon to help others, give advice, money, information, time, services for free…

I have these ideas about success that I have just made up -Pooof! – From nowhere!  Yes, I defiantly have a fear of Success, as you can see.  I made all of that up.  I don’t know what it is like to be successful and I won’t know until I get over this stupid little fear I have.  I am worried about I know nothing about.  A fear of success is far worse than a fear of failure.

‘Procrastination is the fear of success.’ Chinese fortune cookie

These are the Fears

I will have to out-do my success with more success?  Once you get successful you need to remain that success, right?  Of course – So if this next project works, then I am going to have to come up with another better project after that or I’ll be just like Harper Lee and everyone will think my more famous and more consistently successful friend wrote my dam book for me.

Successful people are exposed, criticized? Successful people are often in the public eye or being recognised for great things they have done.  Successful people are the ones that everyone else wants to bring down.   You have done it yourself.  I have.  I have looked at a successful person and been certain that I would have made a far better outfit choice or I would have stood differently. ‘How did she pick that dress I’m mean really?

Success will transform me into someone else?  My friends wont like me anymore because I will be different.  I am scared of becoming someone else – My partner fell in love with me when I was a very unorganized, slightly alcoholic, Art School student who never finished any paintings.  He loves me for who I am right now – Not who I will be when I am successful…Ekk

When there is any kind of change, there is always a fear of loosing who you are and what you have.  Instead os thinking as a change as a moving away from yourself, try to think of a change as you gaining more of yourself.  Image you are adding onto your personality, your skills, your achievements – not away from who you are.  You will still be the same person, just with new skills.

The truth is that being successful is probably easier than you think – For starters, you will have more money (If you haven’t picked it up already, I am talking about ‘Career Success’ not relationships or family crap)

If you can get by with not much money, as you have been so so long (as a writer I am guessing)  then think of how easy it will become once you start getting paid more or get publishing in heaps of journals.  J.K Rowling said it very well in her interview with Oprah.  Once she became a successful writer, she realised that she could throw money are her writing problems.  It was a relief for her to realise that she did not have to put up with writing at her kitchen table amidst the noise and mess of her home life.

So what can you do?

The Cure to A Fear of Success – Oprah –

Many of my clients find this simple exercise helpful: Think of a recent success—say, a new account that you won. Now make a list of the skills and qualities you drew on to win it—determination, intelligence, creativity, charm.… (If you’re struggling, ask a friend for help; others can often see your assets more clearly than you can.) Make this exercise a habit each time something goes well at work. Once you begin to see your strengths in action every day, you will recognize that you are, in fact, well-equipped to tackle whatever challenges lie ahead.

If none of that works – Just remember that you are only brave when you are doing something that scares the shit out of you.  Life is too short for first world problems …

Organising that trip to Melbourne

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For 6 Nights, I will be swapping this view…

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 …for this view.

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Three days to Go!  Now I am going to be honest with you, I don’t much care for big cities at the moment – but I very much like Emerging Writers and I am very into Festivals, So… I will make an exception.

I have been living on the Far South Coast of NSW for the last four months and have become very used to the pace of things down here (Up here I guess?).  People drive slowly and everyone talks about the surf; waiters moonlight as prawn fishermen and everyone in the whole town wants to see photos from my wedding.  Everyone is someone here.

Traveling Solo

So I am bracing myself for Melbourne – Where no one will talk to me in the supermarket and people wont recognise my car.  Actually, I am a little worried about heading to the Festival on my own.

Normally I would be with some literary enthusiast friend who will come with me to hear strange readings of absurdest poetry or drink coffee with me during breaks at the writers centre.  Nope!  Not this time!  Just me.  It will be just like that time I was left on Pier 2 @ Sydney Writers Festival because my best friend had to go to her mothers birthday party or something?  Where was the loyalty?  Just suddenly go very nervous about making friends in Melbourne.

Things that are incredibly less fun to do on your own include playing Uno (funny really considering the name) going to Writers Festivals in other cities, getting lost in other cities, dropping tiny cakes in cafes only to instinctively flick it back up onto the plate with your knee, leaving you thrilled and impressed and turning on the spot hoping someone else saw it, cause no body will believe you (or care) when you tell them later.

Must remember not to do any sort of  impressive small-cake acrobatics while I’m away – will only lead to sadness.

I fly down to Melbourne on Thursday afternoon.  Thank goodness my home town has an airport!

Things to do before I go
  1. Look for MyKi Card from last trip to Melbourne.
  2. Pack (Walked into laundry just then and realised this would be greatly facilitated by washing clothes first)
  3. Wash clothes.
  4. Pack.
  5. Check email about how I get my tickets.
  6. Book Accommodation.
  7. Investigate the coffee at the Wheelers Centre.
  8. Download last Ep of Mad Men to watch on the plane.
  9. Verbalise desire to borrow a bike for 6 nights and see if I can manifest one.
  10. Ask Friends & Family if anyone is friends with Hannah Kent?

Im pretty sure getting around will be easy enough in Melbourne.  Between the trains, trams and foot traffic potential I am not too worried about getting to where I need to go.  Have just been reading article from #ewf14  Getting around Melbourne Guide‘ and everything looks close together.  I am hoping I can get my walking feet on actually.

Ok time to get serious!

 

 

6 Books Every Emerging Writer Must Read

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The Emerging Writer, Writers, Writer

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1. Bird by Bird

by Anne LaMott.

This book is a really inspiring and practical book for writers.

Readers will be reminded of the energizing books of writer Natalie Goldberg and will be seduced by Lamott’s witty take on the reality of a writer’s life, which has little to do with literary parties and a lot to do with jealousy, writer’s block and going for broke with each paragraph.

Reading this book, I realised how much further I could push my writing and my characters.  It was this book that helps me to understand how shallow I was writing and how much my writing could improve if I was brave enough to be honest and write something that mattered.

Marvelously wise and best of all, great reading.

 

The Emerging Writer, Writing.

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2. The Little Red Writing Book

by Mark Tredinnick. 

(Released as Writing Well in America)

I should probably credit this book as the catalyst for my conversion from the Visual Arts to the Literary Arts.  I love the style and strength of this book, which includes a whole chapter on writing with grace.

The Little Red Writing Book is a guide to expressive creative writing and effective professional prose. The author, a poet, writer, editor and teacher, explains the techniques required for stylish and readable writing. Everyone who wants to improve their writing can benefit from this book, which describes how to: • identify topics that inspire you to write • get into the habit of writing regularly • develop ideas • construct effective arguments • choose words for maximum effect • use grammar correctly • structure sentences and paragraphs appropriately • write with integrity The book is enriched by examples from great modern writers, and includes a variety of exercises and suggestions for writing activities.

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3. On Writing, A memoir of the Craft. 

by Stephen King.

Every writing blog on earth recommends writers to read this book…and you will find we are no different.  One of the most famous writing works for writers.  Need we say more?

Part memoir, part master class by one of the bestselling authors of all time, this superb volume is a revealing and practical view of the writer’s craft, comprising the basic tools of the trade every writer must have.

King’s advice is grounded in his vivid memories from childhood through his emergence as a writer, from his struggling early career to his widely reported near-fatal accident in 1999 — and how the inextricable link between writing and living spurred his recovery. Brilliantly structured, friendly and inspiring, “On Writing” will empower and entertain everyone who reads it — fans, writers, and anyone who loves a great story well told

 

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4. The Icarus Deception

by Seth Godin.

‘Make Something Happen’ They are the words on Seth Godin’s homepage.

Everyone knows that Icarus’s father made him wings and told him not to fly too close to the sun; he ignored the warning and plunged to his doom. The lesson: Play it safe. Listen to the experts.  But we tend to forget that Icarus was also warned not to fly too low, because seawater would ruin the lift in his wings. Flying too low is even more dangerous than flying too high, because it feels deceptively safe.

In his book ‘The Icarus Deception’ Godin talks of the obligation we have towards ourselves and the world, to make art.  Godin discussed the issues we face when we fly too low, under achieve and ignore our potential.  This book speaks of Art and Society and the World and Life…. great read if you need to be pulled back on track.  But it is not just a book about what you are doing wrong, it also give practical and real advice on how to make sure you don’t fly too low.

A great read…actually now that I think about it, you should probably read ‘Tribes’ as well.

Emerging Writers, Manuscrapped

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5. Story

by Robert McKee. 

I put off reading this book for a long time because I believed it was just for screen writers.  It is not.  This book is for every Story Teller!

Story is a complex and thorough break down of ‘Story Craft’ with a focus on excellence and quality.  McKee demands excellence from every word you write.  He wants you to be good, better, and the best.  I found it great to be driven to such high standards.

Robert McKee’s screenwriting workshops have earned him an international reputation for inspiring novices, refining works in progress and putting major screenwriting careers back on track. Quincy Jones, Diane Keaton, Gloria Steinem, Julia Roberts, John Cleese and David Bowie are just a few of his celebrity alumni. Writers, producers, development executives and agents all flock to his lecture series, praising it as a mesmerizing and intense learning experience.

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6. The War of Art

by Steven Pressfield.

If you find yourself asking yourself (and your friends), “Am I really a writer? Am I really an artist?” Chances are you are. The counterfeit innovator is wildly self-confident. The real one is scared to death.”

Are you paralysed with fear? That’s a good sign. Fear is good. Like self-doubt, fear is an indicator. Fear tells us what we have to do. Remember one rule of thumb: the more scared we are of a work or calling, the more sure we can be that we have to do it.

A succinct, engaging, and practical guide for succeeding in any creative sphere, The War of Art is nothing less than Sun-Tzu for the soul. hat keeps so many of us from doing what we long to do? Why is there a naysayer within? How can we avoid the roadblocks of any creative endeavor—be it starting up a dream business venture, writing a novel, or painting a masterpiece? Bestselling novelist Steven Pressfield identif ies the enemy that every one of us must face, outlines a battle plan to conquer this internal foe, then pinpoints just how to achieve the greatest success.

Happy Reading Emerging Writers!

 

 

 

Where did all the good time go?

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by Jacob Henwood.

I’m not going to talk about how to write well. I don’t think I am the person to come to for that sort of thing. Not on account of my inability to string words together in a pleasing fashion, but because I’m yet  to present much evidence that it is something that I can do. If it’s what you’re looking for, there are lots of books on the subject by a great many people whose opinions on the matter are backed by the weight of this evidence.

Before quality though comes productivity. This is the first step. A blank page may hold infinite possibilities, but a full page holds the first step to not wasting them. I can talk about productivity. I have productively written for a number of years now. I can sit down and write a 2,000 to 5,000 word story outline in an hour. I do a lot of different types of writing, and I do it with both stealth and ease. If you’re looking for stealth, then you are going to need to invest in a quiet keyboard, or a pen. Pens are quiet. If you’re interested in ease, then keep reading.

Words aren’t always in the habit of being there when we want them. This isn’t really about the words though. It isn’t about writers block either. That’s just a name that we use. Despite all appearances, writing is like drawing, playing the cello, or anything else we need to train ourselves to do with ease. For the most part we tend to assume that however many years of school and university have prepared us for this, but think about the time we would put aside for 2,000 words, or 1,500. Where do we now find the time in our lives for 85,000 words? In reality you are more likely to need to find the time for whatever the actual number of words it is going to take you to write 85,000 good words. Words that carry with them everything that you need of them.

This isn’t something that I figured out. It is something I researched. It is something the authors that I respect discovered through necessity, because for them it was part of the trade. A skill that needed mastering in order that bills be paid. Tom Wolfe, Philip K. Dick, Agatha Christie, Edmond Hamilton, Ray Bradbury, Steven Moffet, and so many others relied on their ability to continue to write whenever it was needed of them.

My first step in understanding this process was the work of Philip K. Dick, whose prolific output and commitment to the concepts behind each of his works is, to my mind, without peer. Dick wrote when he was sleep deprived, discontent, depressed, detached, and, most importantly, when he made the time. Dick wrote a lot of material that he was not happy with (the majority of which was not published), but if you were to say that only 1 in 5 of Dick’s published stories is worth reading, that would still be 10 novels and 20 short stories.

Read more at United By Glue – Where did all the time go… 

Is there such a thing as an Emerging Writer?

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what is an emerging writer?, Emerging writersThere is no such thing as an Emerging Writer – You are either born a writer or you’re not.’

The other day while I was discussing my website with a group of people, I was confronted by this harsh and elitist response.  ‘Wow…’ I thought as I listened to the strangest rant I have ever heard in my life, ‘Do people really believe this?’

To say that you are born a writer completely negates everyones ability to grow, change, learn and evolve.  As an ex high school teacher I cannot believe in this kind of twisted fatalistic dogma.  To believe that we cannot learn to be a writer (well) is scary and weird.

To Emerge: to develop, unfold, to come forth, arrive, turn up.

I do agree with people who state that some children are better build, physically, to play different sports, but that does not mean that every tall child ‘is born’ a basketball player.  Children who enjoy reading at a young age will probably have a better vocabulary and a heightened sense of grammar structures, which will most likely mean that they do well in English – but that is about it.

Of course there is such a thing as an Emerging Writer, with the same truth as there are apprentice plumbers, pre pubescent teenagers, crawling infants who can’t yet walk and journalists applying for newspaper cadetships.  To say that we are born a complete sum of our eventual parts is horrifying to say the least and is an elitist approach to words, which by their nature, consistency and rules are meant to be inclusive, shared and experienced by as many people possible.

I believe I am an Emerging Writer.  I am certainly not a professional writer and I don’t expect to be treated like one.  I am also not not a writer either.  I am in a half way place, and it helps to have a name for it.  I wont be an Emerging Writer for ever, as emerging, by definition indicates a motion forward, but for the moment, it’s a great place to be.

Don’t let anyone tell you, ‘You are either born a writer or you aren’t’.

Bit your thumb at them and walk away.

 

 

IMG_0493Meghan Brewster is a Blogger, Freelance writer and general spinner of Fiction. She is the founder and editor of The Emerging Writers Diary, as well as Itp & Me, a website dedicated to managing the rare platelet disorder, ITP. To find out more about Meghan Brewster follow this link.  By making purchases through links on this website you are helping to support a young emerging writer. Thank you.

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Year One; The Diary of an Emerging Writer

Year One, Emerging Writers Diary, Meghan Brewster
Book Release!  Year One is Here!

Have you ever wondered what it would feel like to make the decision to become a full time writer?

Have you ever wondered what would happen if you saved up all your money, quit your job and jumped head first into a new life?

– Year One –

This is a story about one woman deciding to become a writer; from a naive inner city waitress to an anxious semi professional full time writer.  This is the diary of those first 12 months.  This is the diary of what it was like and how life as a writer began to unfold.

It turns out writing is harder and more surprising than anyone could have guessed.

 – Out Now for March 2014 – 
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Criticism; And what to do with it

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Receiving criticism, emerging writers diary, writingCriticism.  I always knew it was coming.  Every writer, every writing book and everyone tried to prepare me for it.  I have been writing full time for about a year now.  I have been posting content on this, and another site regularly for a long time.  Mostly I have received quite positive feedback, but nothing could prepare me for the wave of nausea and doubt that puled the floor from under me, when I posted an particular article a little while ago.

Over the last year I have learnt a great deal and have loved watching my skills progress – slowly but surely.  I am proud of how far I have come and I am excited for the future… But when I received messages like this one – I had to wonder ‘What the hell was I doing?’ 

Nothing can prepare you for the first time you put your work out there and you receive a barrage of negative, or should I say ‘constructive criticism’.  Logically you know how to handle it, but emotionally and physically, you can’t help reacting.

Receiving Criticism, emerging writers, The emerging writers diary

From Reddit

You might be thinking this comment is is not that bad.  Well, there was a lot more than this. This comment was the best of it.

What is the worst part in all of this, is that they are right!  I am wondering if I am just not good enough to be a writer.

So what do you do with Criticism?
  1. Receiving Critcism, emerging writers, the emerging writers diaryFirstly you need to make two columns on a blank piece of paper, for sorting out your criticism into two categories
  2. Title those two categories as follows – Bullshit Hater Nonsense – & – Helpful Tips Just Worded Badly

After the initial shock, or receiving criticism, start to sort through it.  Which catagory does it fall into?  It is just Bullshit Hater Nonsense?  Or is there a Helpful Tip in there that has just been worded very badly?  Either it is wrong – and you can fuck them off – or it is right and you have the chance to learn, change and improve.

Because of the messages I received about my grammar, I went straight to the shops and brought the little Green Grammar Book and started to read it.  Wow, I still have so much to learn about writing, but that’s ok.

Why Criticism is Great!

Having your writing criticised is the best thing that can happen to you.  It means you’re a writer.  Every writing student will go through this at one point or another.  It is a right of passage through to the other side – Professional writing.  

  1. You are brave enough to put your writing out there.
  2. You are working as a writer.
  3. People are engaged enough in reading your work to respond to it.
  4. You are engaged enough with your audience to hear any criticisms.
  5. You have the chance to learn something fantastic from it.
  6. You have the chance to reaffirm your writing style and your voice.
  7. You are more advanced than every other person claiming to be a writer that has never shared a single word.
  8. You might not know everything on earth – Who Cares!!

I have since gone back and read over all of the other criticisms I received.  I read them over and over again until they did not have any power anymore.  Some where helpful and I have learned from them.  Others I have already forgotten.

If you have got any great words of encouragement to emerging writers we would love to here from you.

 

 

IMG_0493Meghan Brewster is a Blogger, Freelance writer and general spinner of Fiction. She is the founder and editor of The Emerging Writers Diary, as well as Itp & Me, a website dedicated to managing the rare platelet disorder, ITP. To learn more about Meghan Brewster follow this link. By making purchases through links on this website you are helping to support a young emerging writer. Thank you.

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What will happen to the Winner of the Man Booker Prize

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THE WINNER OF THE 2013 MAN BOOKER PRIZE

Every year the Man Booker Prize winner is guaranteed a huge increase in sales, firstly in hardback and then in paperback.  There is spin-off too in global sales of books, in future publishing contracts and in film and TV rights. Besides the fortune, the winner of the Man Booker Prize can also be sure of fame. The announcement of the winner has been covered by television, radio and press worldwide.

Emerging writers diary,

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The Luminaries

Eleanor Catton

2013

It is 1866, and Walter Moody has come to make his fortune upon the New Zealand goldfields.  On arrival, he stumbles across a tense gathering of twelve local men, who have met in secret to discuss a series of unsolved crimes.  A wealthy man has vanished, a whore has tried to end her life, and an enormous fortune has been discovered in the home of a luckless drunk.  Moody is soon drawn into the mystery: a network of fates and fortunes that is as complex and exquisitely patterned as the night sky.
Udayan will give everything for what he believes and in doing so will transform the futures of those dearest to him: his newly married, pregnant wife, his brother and their parents. The repercussions of his actions will link their fates irrevocably and tragically together, reverberating across continents and seeping through the generations that follow.
SHORT HISTORY OF THE PRIZE

The Booker Prize was originally limited to English writers from the Commonwealth but this will be the last year with such a restriction.  From 2014, The Man Booker Prize will be open to authors from everywhere as long as they are written in English and published within the UK the year of the award.  The book cannot be self published or a translation.

The prize was first awarded in 1969, to P H Newby for the novel Something to Answer For.

The prize money awarded with the Booker Prize was originally £21,000, and was subsequently raised to £50,000 in 2002 under the sponsorship of the Man Group.  In 2002 The Man Booker Prize Foundation became a charity.

 

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IMG_0493Meghan Brewster is a Blogger, Freelance writer and general spinner of Fiction. She is the founder and editor of The Emerging Writers Diary, as well as Itp & Me, a website dedicated to managing the rare platelet disorder, ITP. To learn more about Meghan Brewster follow this link. By making purchases through links on this website you are helping to support a young emerging writer. Thank you.

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The 2013 Man Booker Prize Winner Announced!

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The Youngest ever Author Awarded the Man Booker Prize at the young age of 28!  Congratulations Eleanor!

Booker prize 2013, emerging writers, writers diary,

Emerging writers diary,

Click here to Purchase

The Luminaries

Eleanor Catton

2013

It is 1866, and Walter Moody has come to make his fortune upon the New Zealand goldfields.  On arrival, he stumbles across a tense gathering of twelve local men, who have met in secret to discuss a series of unsolved crimes.  A wealthy man has vanished, a whore has tried to end her life, and an enormous fortune has been discovered in the home of a luckless drunk.  Moody is soon drawn into the mystery: a network of fates and fortunes that is as complex and exquisitely patterned as the night sky.
Udayan will give everything for what he believes and in doing so will transform the futures of those dearest to him: his newly married, pregnant wife, his brother and their parents. The repercussions of his actions will link their fates irrevocably and tragically together, reverberating across continents and seeping through the generations that follow.

I am planning to buy the Winner today and read it.  I’ll let you know what I think!!amazon-buy-button_2IMG_0493Meghan Brewster is a Blogger, Freelance writer and general spinner of Fiction. She is the founder and editor of The Emerging Writers Diary, as well as Itp & Me, a website dedicated to managing the rare platelet disorder, ITP. To learn more about Meghan Brewster follow this link. By making purchases through links on this website you are helping to support a young emerging writer. Thank you.

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