Women, Submissions and Self-Publishing

How to publish a book, how to publish an ebook, book writing software, formatting an ebook, self publishing, uploading ebook, selling ebook,

Feature image from CESMAGAINE

For six years Kelli Russell Agodon worked as a co-editor and chief for a literary magazine.  In her piece for Medium, SUBMIT LIKE A MAN published May 2015, she writes about what she learned during that time, and what she knows about how men and women submit their work from consideration.

If I had to make one general statement about what I most learned at the press as an editor, the big revelation was that men and women submit their work differently.

More here – While aware of the generalisations being made, Agodon cannot ignore the overall trends between men and women.  When a rejection letter is sent to a man with the following, ‘We would like to see more of your work,’ a man will tend to actually send more of their work. She puts it done to

When the same rejection letter is sent to a women, she will generally wait 3 to 6 months before resubmitting, if at all.  She puts it done to

She puts it done to the classic problem of women over thinking things, reading too much into the words, not wanting to seem pushy or being happy to settle for an ‘almost.’

I am guilty of this too.  If I am really honest with myself, it is my fear of utter rejection that drove me towards self publishing my work instead of subjecting it to the ridicule of rejection I was certain it would have recieved.

This is stupid I know, as rejection letters are vital to improvement as a writer, self reflection and challening ourselves to work harder and go beyond what we thought.

It seems I am not the only one.

I a survey published by the GUARDIAN in March 2015, it seems self-publishing allows women the chance to circumnavigate their fear of rejections and break the book industry’s glass ceiling.  The number of women selling best sellers through self-publishing is almost twice that of men.

“More and more female writers are seeing success in self-publishing,” said Monique Duarte, chief executive of FicShelf, which released the results to mark International Women’s Day on Sunday 8 March. “It’s a level playing field.”

While men are still dominating traditional publishing it is the ladies who seem to be making self-publishing work for them.

While mainstream publisher are known for playing it safe, it is the self-publishing market that is allowing female writers to step out of these preconceived norms and break the template of what women should be writing about.

AMANDA HOCKING has made millions selling her novels online through self Publishing.

Why Do I Only Get Queries From Dudes?

getting book reviews, Self publishing, self publishing book review, how to get my book reviewed, how to get book reviews, female writers reviews, review women writers

Feature image from TIMEWALKERII

So, I review books.

My details are on a number of different websites, including this one, outlining how indie authors and writers can get in contact with me about reviewing their work.  Authors send me queries, which include details of their novels, and they ask me if I would be interested in reviewing their work.  I say yes to as many reviews as I can.

I receive one or two requests each day.  Many of these I turn down due to time restrictions or a disinterest in the blurb of the book.  But I read every request, consider it and respond.  I have a REVIEW POLICY that helps me choose the books I will consider for review.

I decided that I would always give preference to Indie Australian Female writers as that is my community, and you need to support your own.  The only thing is, they never write to me – Ever.  Since I started receiving queries for book reviews I have only ever been contacted by male writers. Continue reading

How to Enter a Short Story Competition

entering a short story, emerging writers

Below you find a fool-proof, fail-safe and realistic-approach to entering a Short Story Competition.  By following these Six Easy Steps and you too can enter any Short Story Competition of your choosing.  If you do not already have a Short Story Competition in mind, read this article from Australian Writing Opportunities first – Enjoy and Good luck to you.

Step One

Decide to Enter the Competition.  This is the most crucial step in the process.  Once you have decided to enter the competition (Any competition of your choosing will be fine) you can start to brainstorm a few ideas and look back through your old work.  You may find something in a discarded draft that could be manipulated and worked into a winning entry.  You may also choose to start from scratch.  I personally prefer starting from scratch as this creates a situation of the most extreme stress, beginning from nothing, and allows you to truly channel a maximum of adrenaline for the next five steps. Continue reading

Pitching Your Work for Publication #pitchbitch

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#pitchbitch

Have you heard about Pitch, Bitch?  I first saw a tweet that contained the hashtag #pitchbitch at the Emerging Writers Festival 2014.  It was an interview with Estelle Tang for Kill Your Darlings about an initiative to promote and encourage women to pitch their work for publication.

Since reading about Pitch, Bitch online, I’ve discovered a lot of publishers and editors are getting involved too.  The pitch, bitch tumblr has great interviews with editors on what not to do.  They are encouraging women to stop everything and sit down for one day a month to work on their pitches, bitches.

What is it?

Continue reading